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avatar Chloe
13 Jun

The skincare world has been raving about Krave ever since its launch in 2018. It’s focus on transparency and ethics has captured the hearts of skincare junkies and vegan-oriented shoppers alike 🌱

The brand wanted to clear the myth that a cleanser needs to be harsh in order to effective. The Matcha Hemp Cleanser is their first product -  let’s take a closer look 🧐🔬

The product is fragrance-free & contains a great selection of moisturising ingredients such as glycerin and prunus amygdalus dulcet oil (sweet almond oil). In terms of improving the skin barrier function, it contains Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil and Avena Sativa Kernel Extract (Oats). The product also contains Panthenol (a form of Vitamin B5) which reduces itching, redness and calms down inflammation. It also acts as a moisturising ingredient (its both a humectant and emollient). 

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avatar Chloe
11 Jun

Late May, tennis superstar Venus Williams teamed up with Credo Beauty to create a mineral sunscreen collection. She is known for helping make her sport a more inclusive space for people of colour, especially black women, a task she also took to heart when creating her first beauty product 🎾 🥂

Historically, sunscreens have been known to leave an especially visible white cast or ashy finish on people of colour. This gap is slowly being filled by both small and larger companies -- with a sunscreen being the number 1 product of any routine, it’s important that the skincare industry to caters to everyone!🌏

The EleVen by Venus x Credo collaboration launched 2 products: the On-The-Defense Sunscreen SPF30 and the Unrivaled Sun Serum SPF 30. We’ll focus on the latter☀️

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maria
11 Jun

Today it is easy to get lost in the booming skincare market. Hundreds of new products are released every day. Of course, it is great to have a choice, but it gets overwhelming: What skincare products do I even need? How do I know if a product is worth the money? How do I know which product will work better? These 5 tips will help you look beyond pretty packaging and select great skincare products faster.

1. Go for one-purpose skincare products

Effective products, except for simple moisturizers, need to include solid active ingredients that are at least in theory able to do what the product promises. Most skincare ingredients that fall into this category are notoriously capricious. They are not easy to formulate with and always demand some kind of special treatment in the formula, packaging or both. Think about vitamin C (unstable), retinol (photosensitive), sunscreens (require very particular formulations to be stable and form an even protective layer on the skin). Because of this, the more “dedicated” a product is, the higher the chances for an appropriate concentration of active ingredients and that the formula is specifically designed to maximize the effectiveness of the actives. For example, a sunscreen that is formulated to be a sunscreen rather than an “x in 1” product (foundation, primer, moisturizer, antioxidant and sunscreen) is more likely to do the main active ingredient justice.

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maria
11 Jun

If you have an occasional breakout, clogged pores or more persistent spots, you need a product with salicylic acid in your life. Here is why.

Salicylic acid is one of a few ingredients that has solid clinical evidence for being effective against acne. It helps to clear up clogged pores, heal inflamed blemishes faster and prevent new ones from forming. It can do it because of the two main properties. First, it is a good anti-inflammatory agent. It helps calm down the inflammation like the one inside and around a red breakout. Its second superpower is the ability to exfoliate inside pores and hair follicles, explaining its effectiveness against spots and clogged pores. In contrast to other chemical exfoliants used in skincare (for example, glycolic and lactic acid) which are water-soluble, salicylic acid is oil-soluble, meaning that it can mix with lipids in our skin and be effective a little bit deeper inside our skin.

If you have an occasional breakout, clogged pores or more persistent spots, you need a product with salicylic acid in your life. Here is why.

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maria
11 Jun

The cleansing action in any cleanser comes from the compounds called "surfactants". They are molecules with two different ends: one end loves oil, and the other one loves water. Because of this property, these molecules get attracted to oil on one side, and also pull towards water on the other - and this is how you remove dirt and oil from your skin when you use a cleanser, and then rinse it off with water. A physical action of whipping the surfactants off together with a bit of water present in the product achieves the same effect - this is how micellar waters work (we still recommend to rinse micellar water off with water to make sure no surfactants remain on the skin to reduce the risk of irritation).

Not all surfactants produce foam. The ability of a surfactant to produce foam has nothing to do with its cleansing abilities (as in your skin can get perfectly clean without any foam whatsoever). It is just so happened that the first surfactant that was readily available for skin cleansing (soap) creates foam, and this is how we've learned to associate foam with cleanliness.

Ok, so foam is not needed for a good cleansing, but is it bad for the skin or is it a harmless add-on to make the cleansing experience more fun?

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maria
11 Jun

Cleansing is always a stress for our skin. As we remove the dirt, sunscreen, sweat or sebum, we also inevitably remove some of the skin's protective lipid layer and interfere with the surface's pH. Even contact with a plain water has some of this effect and can lead to irritation of the most sensitive skin.

The more cleansing steps you take, the higher the risk you'll disrupt your skin's barrier. So think twice before falling for the double-cleanse hype.

If you feel that you need an extra step to remove make-up, limit it to the area that needs it - for example, eyes or lips only. If you can remove the make-up and sunscreen with one gentle product, it is almost certainly be better for your skin than two cleansing steps. At the same time, if you feel that you need to use a "harsher" cleanser to get the job done in one step, two separate cleanses, each with a gentler product, would be still a better choice.

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avatar Chloe
10 Jun

I love a good spongebob meme

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avatar Chloe
10 Jun

Reading a skincare label can be terrifying - lots of symbols and ingredient names that seem like a foreign language. But it doesn’t have to be that way! 🚫Understanding the basics of a label can be empowering when choosing/buying a product🤩

Note: In the EU, if a product contains one of the 26 allergens official allergens, it needs to be listed on the product explicitly. You can find it with an Asterix (*) or in italic. There are also differences in labelling between the EU and the US which we can explore in another post!🌍

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maria
10 Jun

UVA rays are a type of light emitted from the sun. UVA rays are known to cause premature skin aging with wrinkles, elasticity loss, and age spots. They can also trigger hyperpigmentation (for example, post-acne marks and melasma). UVA rays are responsible for the natural tanning of our skin (this is why the so called "healthy tan" always comes together with skin damage). UVA rays contribute to development of skin cancers.

UVA rays are defined based on the length of their wave. UVA light has the wavelength between 320 and 400 nanometers. Not all UVA sunscreen filters can cover this range in full, and this is why it is useful to split the UVA spectrum further into the UVA I (the longest UVA waves with the length of 340 to 400 nanometers) and UVA II (shorter UVA waves with the length of 320 to 340 nanometers). Most of the UV radiation we are exposed to falls within the UVA I range (long rays). At the same time, protection against the UVA I rays (the longer ones) is the most tricky to achieve. Because of that, in skincare, a sunscreen filter is defined as a UVA one in most cases only if it is able to protect against the long UVA waves (UVA I).

In general, all UVA waves are shorter than the UVB ones. This is why they are able to penetrate human skin deeper than the UVB light. At the same time, UVA light has less energy in it, meaning that it does not cause a direct damage to the skin cell DNA in the same way that the UVB rays do. Unfortunately, it is still causing the DNA damage, but through an indirect mechanism (it creates free radicals that then can cause chemical reactions that are harmful to the skin health).

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