Matahari Matahari
3 months ago

How effective is this hybrid sunscreen?

Always hunting for sunscreens that are safe and NON-damaging to skin of colour and other sensitive skin types. We’re looking for effective and affordable formulas. THIS sunscreen I’m more interested in use on the body, not face, so white-cast is more of a secondary concern. I’m interested in strong protection during outdoor activities! I see that all of the active ingredients in this sunscreen qualify both as physical (mineral) AND organic (chemical). How does that work?? (I DO often prefer hybrid sunscreens!) What is it about these particular active substances, anyone know? Any references to relevant articles and/or research? (Am most interested in understandable articles. 😏) ~ Thanks, everyone!

Rohto Mentholatum - Skin Aqua UV Super Moisture Milk Pink SPF50+ PA++++
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Maybe this article can be of interest re the hybrid sunscreen formulas: https://knowledge.ulprospector.com/7914/pcc-formulating-metal-oxide-based-sunscreens/ Avobenzone shouldn't be used with zinc oxide because of a risk of a reaction between them on sunlight exposure that could decrease the UVA protection of avobenzone and even produce some harmful byproducts (the risk can be minimized if a specially coated zinc oxides particles are used, but the coating details are usually not disclosed by manufacturers and an in any case only a testing lab could give a clear answer). This particular product uses Octinoxate. It is not known to cause problems with zinc oxide, but it is a relatively common allergen and can be irritating, too. I personally prefer not to have it my sunscreens. "Octinoxate has been reported as a contact and photocontact allergen; it can also cause phototoxic contact dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis. The majority of the reported adverse reactions to octinoxate constitute allergies and photoallergies that are documented in multiple reports and studies, while irritant and phototoxic contact dermatitis are not common (only one published study)." (https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ics.12471)

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